Archives for category: Lenten Devotional

Do good for ZionDavid's towers

“Do good to Zion in your good pleasure;”

– Psalm 51:17a

Most scholars believe that Psalm 51 originally ended at verse 16 and that verses 17 and 18 were later additions.   As a consequence, the lectionary reading  for Psalm 51 ends at verse 16.

Scholars suggest that verses 17 and 18 were added during the so-called Persian era, when the Judeans who were exile in Babylon were returning to the ruins of Jerusalem with the hope and intent of rebuilding the temple and the city.  “Do good to Zion in your good pleasure” is a plea for God’s blessings upon the city.

Do we pray for our cities today?  The mayoral elections for the City of Raytown are on April 7th — please vote if you’re a  Raytown resident!  I would ask God to guide both candidates and the voters as we approach that decision.   There are also elections in Kansas City and the surrounding communities in April.

There is so much to pray for.  For our schools and the teachers who open so many doors to our children and help mold them in these early years.   For our police, fire and other first responders who place their own lives at risk to protect and serve us in times of need.  For our government officials who can advance policies of fairness and inclusion as well as promote the economic well-being of our communities.   For the business leaders who are able to create opportunities for work that support families and  provide needed products and services.   For the churches and other faith communities that help guide people toward God and service to one another.

In the midst of this Lenten season it’s useful to remember that Jesus went to the cross not simply for us    individually, but for us as a society, as communities, and for the entire world.  Most of his  teachings are offered in the plural ‘you.’  We lose sight of this because English, unlike many other languages, doesn’t distinguish between the singular and plural 2nd person.   “For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son so that those who believe in him may not perish, but have eternal life”  (John 3:16)

Prayer

Dear Lord,

We pray for Raytown, Kansas City, Blue Springs, Independence, Lee’s Summit, Grandview, Leawood, Overland Park and all the other communities around the KC metro.  Do good to them in your good pleasure.

Amen

 

Contrite heart33a.  Contrite heart

“. . . a broken and contrite heart, O God, you will not despise.”

– Psalm 51:17b

Where do you place the word “contrite”?    I mean, where do you most often hear that word being used?   For me, I think of the courtroom.  I imagine a news report that reads something like “The convicted defendant faced the jury with a steely countenance;  she showed no contrition for what she had done.”  Or perhaps “The defendant was contrite and, weeping, apologized to the victim and their family from the stand.”

My online dictionary search gives a definition for contrite as:   feeling or expressing remorse or penitence; affected by guilt.   Interestingly, the definition is then immediately followed by a citation from today’s verse, “a broken and contrite heart.”

Let us remember where we’ve come in verses 16 and 17 —   “For you have no delight in sacrifice; if I were to give a burnt offering, you would not be pleased.  The sacrifice acceptable to God is a broken spirit; a broken and contrite heart, O God, you will not despise.”   This invites us to ponder the nature of insincere worship (both corporate and individual)  and then the authentic baring of one’s soul to God.  Does our Sunday worship give us the opportunity to do this?   Do we do this on our own time?

Unlike my imagined courtroom scenes, we stand before a different judge.  We step into the witness stand, our Lord presiding, and we have the opportunity to either (a) try to talk our way out of something or (b) open our heart.   Thankfully, this judge is our ever- loving God.  Isaiah 57:15 portrays God’s outlook upon us   beautifully:  For this is what the high and lofty One says– he who lives forever, whose name is holy: “I live in a high and holy place, but also with him who is contrite and lowly in spirit, to revive the spirit of the lowly and to revive the heart of the contrite.

Jesus of course continued this mission of reviving the spirit of the lowly and those with contrite hearts.  He told a crowd on the hillside:  “Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.   Blessed are those who mourn, for they will be comforted.   Blessed are the meek, for they will inherit the earth” (Matt 5:1-5).

33b.Prayer 

Precious Lord,

Take our hand.  Help us to come before you and, without guile or pretense, honestly offer our lives to you.  Help us to be both contrite and trusting in the one whose love endures forever.

Amen

 

A broken spirit  32c.  Broken Spirit

“The sacrifice acceptable to God is a broken spirit; ”

– Psalm 51:17a

Our psalm continues to re-think the use of sacrifice.   In verse 16, the psalmist had declared For you [God] have no delight in sacrifice.”   Now, the writer turns to identify what IS an appropriate sacrifice — “a broken spirit.”

That may seem odd.  In other times in scripture, such as Psalm 34, the Lord seeks to rescue those who are broken:   The LORD is close to the brokenhearted and saves those who are crushed in spirit (Psalm 34:18).

The prophet Isaiah raises the same call:  “The Spirit of the Sovereign LORD is on me, because the LORD has anointed me to preach good news to the poor. He has sent me to bind up the brokenhearted, to proclaim freedom for the captives and release from darkness for the prisoners, to proclaim the year of the LORD’s favor and the day of vengeance of our God, to comfort all who mourn, and provide for those who grieve in Zion– to bestow on them a crown of beauty instead of ashes, the oil of gladness instead of mourning, and a garment of praise instead of a spirit of despair (Isaiah 61:1-3).   That seems a great distance from Psalm 51:17.

Perhaps this verse is more about our willfulness, our head-strong determination to do-what-we-want-when-we-want-to-do-it!   It makes me think of how ranchers use the term of “breaking” a horse.  Prior to such a “breaking,” wild horses are unrideable.   They won’t accept a bit, let alone a saddle or person in the saddle.  But there comes a 32a.  Broken Spirittime when the horse submits in what is hopefully a humane process.   Some horses are more of a challenge than others, which has led to the acclaim of the so-called “horse whisperers” — people who have a touch with the animals.

This verse makes me think of the whisper of God in our lives.  The gentle, ever present calling for us to set aside our ego, our plans, our priorities — and to submit to God.

Prayer

Almighty God,

We may resist your call upon our lives.   We may canter off to the farthest fields, and buck every attempt you make to place a hand upon us and direct our path.  But we pray that you will be patient with us and  continue to call, until we come, willingly, and give you the reins of our lives.

Amen

 

Burnt offering31.  Burnt offerings

“. . .  if I were to give a burnt offering, you would not  be pleased.”       – Psalm 51:16b

I would sit at the edge of the fire pit and poke at the logs and embers  as they cracked in the night.  You could watch as bits of ash and other scorched debris lifted into the night sky, following the updraft of the column of smoke.

In biblical times, the ritual of giving a burnt offering is established under Noah and then directed in Numbers 28:3 —  ‘This is the food offering you are to present to the LORD: two lambs a year old without defect, as a regular burnt offering each day.’   These rituals were central to the early worshipping practices of the people of Israel.

The term “burnt offering” is derived from the Hebrew noun olah, which has the meaning of “that which went up [in smoke].”   It is drawn from the verb alah meaning “to ascend.”  In later years, it was translated, eerily for our modern consciousness, into the term “holocaust.”    So while the NRSV translates Exodus 18:12 as  “And Jethro, Moses’ father-in-law, brought a burnt offering and sacrifices to God;” this same passage is rendered by the New American Bible as “Then Jethro, the father-in-law of Moses, brought a holocaust and other sacrifices to God.”

One of the most wrenching stories in the Old Testament comes as Abraham takes his son Isaac up a mountain with the intent, per the Lord’s instructions, of giving his son as a burnt offering to God.  Only at the last moment is the boy spared as the ram appears in the thicket.

Our verse fragment today from Psalm 51 follows yesterday’s “Part A” of verse 16 that  “For you have no delight in sacrifice”.  Part B, per usual, expands on the Part A —  “. . . if I were to give a burnt offering, you would not  be pleased.”    The psalmist understands that the Lord wants something else, something different, something more than these ritualistic burnt offerings — and that will be explored in the next verse on Thursday and Friday.

But sitting as we are on the doorstep of Holy Week, we cannot help but to consider the sacrifice that is just in the offing.  The death on Calvary will not include fire.  But in the dark days that follow, it will involve a  lifting up, an ascent.

Prayer

Holy God,

As we stand before you today, help us to discern the ways that we can dedicate our lives to you.   And we thank you for the sacrificial gift of your son, whom you raised, to set us all free.

Amen

 

Declare your praise 29.  Declare your praise

“O Lord, open my lips, and my mouth will declare your praise.”

– Psalm 51:14

There’s something very elemental about this verse that is vital to how we live our lives.   It has to do with sequence.  The psalmist asks the Lord to open his lips and then his mouth will declare God’s praise.   Everything begins with God.

So I’d like to invite you to interrupt this reading of this devotion and sit back for a moment and reflect for a moment on all that’s before you in your life.  What are all your to-dos?  What are the biggest challenges that are before you?  What is sapping your energy because it’s just too big, too much of a hassle, too difficult, or for whatever reason daunting for you?   Whatever that is, take a break for a couple moments and just lay it before God.  Ask for guidance, for strength, for understanding, for compassion, for courage, for patience.  And then meet me back in the next paragraph.

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I pray that God will open your lips, your mind, your heart or whatever is needed as you go forward in this day that has been given to us.

Another aspect of this verse which is so valuable is the simple idea of praise.  When do you praise someone?  Usually it’s when they’ve done a good job for something.  How often is it that we praise God in-between       Sundays?   How often do we praise the Lord for just this opportunity to be alive — whatever the challenges?   The psalms themselves are full of praise.  Even the so-called “psalms of lament” often conclude with a word of praise.   Psalm 22 contains the most famous lament from the Bible which is remembered by our Lord from the cross (My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?).   But even this psalm will say:   “I will declare your name to my brothers; in the congregation I will praise you . . .  All the ends of the earth will remember and turn to the LORD, and all the families of the nations will bow down before him for dominion belongs to the LORD and he rules over the nations.”     Let everything that lives and breathes praise the Lord.

 

Prayer

Praise the LORD.

Praise the LORD, O my soul.

I will praise the LORD all my life;

I will sing praise to my God as long as I live.   (Psalm 146:1-2)

Amen

 

Will return26.  Will return

“. . .  and sinners will return to you.

– Psalm 51:13b

Rembrandt painted one of the most evocative images of the return of a sinner.   In his “The Return of the Prodigal Son,” he captures the scene where the wayward younger son, grimy from his time among the pigs and his long trek home, buries his face in the robes of his father.   The visual center of the painting is where the father’s hands rest upon his son’s shoulders and hold him close.  Some have suggested that Rembrandt made the father’s left hand masculine (larger, a bit more rough) and his right hand feminine (more smooth and slender).   Was Rembrandt suggesting both maternal and paternal qualities in the father’s (God’s) forgiveness?

The writer of Psalm 51 now speaks of a remarkable transformation.  Upon receiving God’s forgiveness (the restoration of the joy of salvation), the psalmist declares that  “Then I will teach transgressors your ways and sinners will return to you.”   The writer who himself was lost, fortified with God’s forgiveness, now goes out to reach others who are lost.

How often is it in the Bible that we read of how God uses someone who was lost or even hostile to God’s purposes (think Jacob or Saul of Tarsus).    In some of these cases, the transformation is so great that God re-names the person (Jacob to Israel, Saul to Paul).    That’s good news twice over.   No matter what has taken place in our lives, God can use us, indeed is seeking to use us, to further God’s kingdom.   And if we happen to count ourselves among the lost, God is using people of faith to find us, reach us, and guide us back home.

Prayer

O lead me, Lord, that I may lead
The wandering and the wavering feet;
O feed me, Lord, that I may feed
Thy hungering ones with manna sweet.

O use me, Lord, use even me,
Just as Thou wilt, and when, and where,
Until Thy blessèd face I see,
Thy rest, Thy joy, Thy glory share.

Amen

 

 

1.  Have mercy

 WELCOME

Welcome to this series of devotionals during the season of Lent.   Starting on February 18th, I will be posting a devotional for each of the forty days of Lent (this excludes Sundays).    Join me as we journey through this season of penance and reflection through a daily consideration of Psalm 51 — a phrase at a time.  I will juxtapose the Psalm phrase with another passage of scripture, perhaps from a gospel, epistle or other text drawn from the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament).   Through these two daily scriptural selections, we will probe together the Christian experience and meaning of following our Lord as he makes his way to the cross — and beyond.  I welcome your comments and reflections as we make our way along.


Have mercy on me, O God, according to your steadfast love.”      

                                                                                –  Psalm 51:1a 

Psalm 51 is traditionally known as the psalm written by King David after he preys upon Bathsheba and then is confronted by the prophet Nathan for his actions.  David crumpled to his knees, either literally or in spirit, and cried out in words and script,  “Have mercy on me, O God, according to your steadfast love.”   Have mercy. 

Across the gospels, Jesus regularly encounters those who beseech him with those same words.   Have mercy.   There were fathers or mothers crying out to Jesus on behalf of a sick child;  lepers;  those suffering demons — or this pair of blind men:

There were two blind men sitting by the roadside. When they heard that Jesus was passing by, they shouted, “Lord, have mercy on us, Son of David!”   The crowd sternly ordered them to be quiet; but they shouted even more loudly, “Have mercy on us, Lord, Son of David!”  Jesus stood still and called them, saying, “What do you want me to do for you?” They said to him, “Lord, let our eyes be opened.”  Moved with compassion, Jesus touched their eyes. Immediately they regained their sight and followed him.   (Matthew 20:30-34)

As we enter into this season of Lent, how mindful are we of our own need for mercy?   Has some person or event in our lives helped to make it clear to us that we need to seek God’s grace and forgiveness?   Are we so bold as to ask for this mercy — or even shout for it?

Prayer

Ever gracious God,

As we step into this season of Lent and confront perhaps the pitfalls or challenges in our lives, remind us of your steadfast love — and that it is according to just this love that we may ask you today to have mercy upon us.

Amen.

Scripture

images (17)61 Mary Magdalene and the other Mary were there, sitting opposite the tomb. 62 The next day, that is, after the day of Preparation, the chief priests and the Pharisees gathered before Pilate 63 and said,

“Sir, we remember what that impostor said while he was still alive, ‘After three days I will rise again.’64 Therefore command the tomb to be made secure until the third day; otherwise his disciples may go and steal him away, and tell the people, ‘He has been raised from the dead,’ and the last deception would be worse than the first.”

65 Pilate said to them, “You have a guard of soldiers; go, make it as secure as you can.”

66 So they went with the guard and made the tomb secure by sealing the stone.

 

Reflection

“Make it as secure as you can.”  Ever since Jesus began his earthly ministry, some people tried to contain Jesus, to pin him down, to limit his impact.   Now, even in death, Pilate sends soldiers to make sure that Jesus didn’t get loose.

Are there ways in our own daily living that seek to make the tomb secure by sealing the stone?  Do we seek to limit Jesus’ reach into our affairs, keep him out of certain transactions, exclude him from entire parts of our lives?

This is just Saturday.   The tomb is still sealed.  But Jesus will not be tamed by Pilate.   And with the light of dawn tomorrow, he will not be quarantined by whatever stones we might choose to keep him bottled up.

 

Prayer

Dear Lord,

We have walked with you these 40 days.  Sometimes we have followed closely.  At other times, we have watched only from afar.  Today, we remain in mourning from the blows of yesterday’s crucifixion, and from the draining, emptying effects of death.

In the wake of your death and that sealed tomb, this is a day absent hope.

It’s just a matter of putting one foot in front of the other.

Breathing.

And waiting to see what Sunday morning will bring.

Amen.

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Todays devotion consists entirely of an illustrated scripture reading from Matthew 27:1-60 as Jesus goes to the cross.

Matthew 27:1-60  

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When morning came, all the chief priests and the elders of the people conferred together against Jesus in order to bring about his death. 2 They bound him, led him away, and handed him over to Pilate the governor.

 

 

 

images (19)3 When Judas, his betrayer, saw that Jesus was condemned, he repented and brought back the thirty pieces of silver to the chief priests and the elders. 4 He said, “I have sinned by betraying innocent blood.” But they said, “What is that to us? See to it yourself.”

5 Throwing down the pieces of silver in the temple, he departed; and he went and hanged himself.

6 But the chief priests, taking the pieces of silver, said, “It is not lawful to put them into the treasury, since they are blood money.” 7 After conferring together, they used them to buy the potter’s field as a place to bury foreigners. 8 For this reason that field has been called the Field of Blood to this day.  9 Then was fulfilled what had been spoken through the prophet Jeremiah, “And they took the thirty pieces of silver, the price of the one on whom a price had been set, on whom some of the people of Israel had set a price, 10 and they gave them for the potter’s field, as the Lord commanded me.”

jesus_before_pilate_jekel11 Now Jesus stood before the governor; and the governor asked him, “Are you the King of the Jews?” Jesus said, “You say so.”

12 But when he was accused by the chief priests and elders, he did not answer.  13 Then Pilate said to him, “Do you not hear how many accusations they make against you?”  14 But he gave him no answer, not even to a single charge, so that the governor was greatly amazed.

15 Now at the festival the governor was accustomed to release a prisoner for the crowd, anyone whom they wanted. 16 At that time they had a notorious prisoner, called Jesus Barabbas.  17 So after they had gathered, Pilate said to them, “Whom do you want me to release for you, Jesus Barabbas or Jesus who is called the Messiah?”  18 For he realized that it was out of jealousy that they had handed him over.  19 While he was sitting on the judgment seat, his wife sent word to him, “Have nothing to do with that innocent man, for today I have suffered a great deal because of a dream about him.”

20 Now the chief priests and the elders persuaded the crowds to ask for Barabbas and to have Jesus killed.  21 The

Pilate Ecce-Homo-Antonio-Ciseri-1880governor again said to them, “Which of the two do you want me to release for you?” And they said, “Barabbas.”

22 Pilate said to them, “Then what should I do with Jesus who is called the Messiah?”

All of them said, “Let him be crucified!”   23 Then he asked, “Why, what evil has he done?”    But they shouted all the more, “Let him be crucified!”

24 So when Pilate saw that he could do nothing, but rather that a riot was beginning, he took some water and washed his hands before the crowd, saying, “I am innocent of this man’s blood; see to it yourselves.”   25 Then the people as a whole answered, “His blood be on us and on our children!

26 So he released Barabbas for them; and after flogging Jesus, he handed him over to be crucified.

mocking of Christ 27 Then the soldiers of the governor took Jesus into the governor’s headquarters, and they gathered the whole cohort around him.  28 They stripped him and put a scarlet robe on him,  29 and after twisting some thorns into a crown, they put it on his head. They put a reed in his right hand and knelt before him and mocked him, saying,

“Hail, King of the Jews!”

30 They spat on him, and took the reed and struck him on the head.

 

stripping of our Lord

 

 

 

31 After mocking him,

they stripped him of the robe and put his own clothes on him.

Then they led him away to crucify him.

 

 

 

 

download (7)32 As they went out, they came upon a man from Cyrene named Simon; they compelled this man to carry his cross.  33 And when they came to a place called Golgotha (which means Place of a Skull), 34 they offered him wine to drink, mixed with gall; but when he tasted it, he would not drink it.  35 And when they had crucified him, they divided his clothes among themselves by casting lots;  36 then they sat down there and kept watch over him.  37 Over his head they put the charge against him, which read, “This is Jesus, the King of the Jews.”

 

images (16) 38 Then two bandits were crucified with him, one on his right and one on his left. 39 Those who passed by derided him, shaking their heads 40 and saying, “You who would destroy the temple and build it in three days, save yourself! If you are the Son of God, come down from the cross.”

41 In the same way the chief priests also, along with the scribes and elders, were mocking him, saying,  42 “He saved others; he cannot save himself. He is the King of Israel; let him come down from the cross now, and we will believe in him.  43 He trusts in God; let God deliver him now, if he wants to; for he said, ‘I am God’s Son.'”

44 The bandits who were crucified with him also taunted him in the same way.

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45 From noon on, darkness came over the whole land until three in the afternoon. 46 And about three o’clock Jesus cried with a loud voice, “Eli, Eli, lema sabachthani?” that is, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?” 47 When some of the bystanders heard it, they said, “This man is calling for Elijah.”

48 At once one of them ran and got a sponge, filled it with sour wine, put it on a stick, and gave it to him to drink.49 But the others said, “Wait, let us see whether Elijah will come to save him.”

 

Jesus on cross

 

50 Then Jesus cried again with a loud voice and breathed his last.

 

 

 

 

 

Centurion4

51 At that moment the curtain of the temple was torn in two, from top to bottom. The earth shook, and the rocks were split.  52 The tombs also were opened, and many bodies of the saints who had fallen asleep were raised. 53 After his resurrection they came out of the tombs and entered the holy city and appeared to many.

 

54 Now when the centurion and those with him, who were keeping watch over Jesus, saw the earthquake and what took place, they were terrified and said,

“Truly this man was God’s Son!”

 

 

 

cvggo_entom_2

55 Many women were also there, looking on from a distance; they had followed Jesus from Galilee and had provided for him. 56 Among them were Mary Magdalene, and Mary the mother of James and Joseph, and the mother of the sons of Zebedee.

57 When it was evening, there came a rich man from Arimathea, named Joseph, who was also a disciple of Jesus.  58 He went to Pilate and asked for the body of Jesus; then Pilate ordered it to be given to him.

59 So Joseph took the body and wrapped it in a clean linen cloth 60 and laid it in his own new tomb, which he had hewn in the rock.

 

 

 

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He then rolled a great stone

to the door of the tomb

and went away.

 

 

 

Scripture

Matthew 26: 69-75images (12)

69 Now Peter was sitting outside in the courtyard. A servant-girl came to him and said, “You also were with Jesus the Galilean.”

70 But he denied it before all of them, saying, “I do not know what you are talking about.”

71 When he went out to the porch, another servant-girl saw him, and she said to the bystanders, “This man was with Jesus of Nazareth.”

72 Again he denied it with an oath, “I do not know the man.”

73 After a little while the bystanders came up and said to Peter, “Certainly you are also one of them, for your accent betrays you.”

74 Then he began to curse, and he swore an oath, “I do not know the man!” At that moment the cock crowed.   75 Then Peter remembered what Jesus had said: “Before the cock crows, you will deny me three times.” And he went out and wept bitterly.

 

Reflection

As we enter into this Maundy Thursday and Good Friday, tradition has us focus upon Peter’s denial of Christ.   This is the enthusiastic disciple — the one who leaped into the water to walk to Christ;  the one who professed to Jesus “You are the Messiah, the Son of the living God”;  the one who said that HE would never deny his Lord.

But then we have our own moments, moments when people effectively say “You are with Jesus” and we deny it.  Moments when someone makes an off-color joke at someone else’s expense, but it’s just a joke so we keep silent.   Or when someone suggests cutting a corner in some enterprise which is not entirely legal or ethical, but we go along and keep silent.  Or when someone asks us for some help and we pretend not to see or hear them.  Or when we cling to old hurts and grudges rather than practice forgiveness.

Or when . . .

 

Prayer

Dear Lord,

We want to follow you, but often we fail.   Sometimes we fail unwittingly, carelessly.  Sometimes we fail intentionally.  Forgive us for the ways that we deny you.  Forgive us and call upon us to be your disciples again.

Amen

 

p.s.  At some point along the way, I missed a day and so my devotions jump from day 36 to day 38.  Call today my “Leap Devotional”!