Will return26.  Will return

“. . .  and sinners will return to you.

– Psalm 51:13b

Rembrandt painted one of the most evocative images of the return of a sinner.   In his “The Return of the Prodigal Son,” he captures the scene where the wayward younger son, grimy from his time among the pigs and his long trek home, buries his face in the robes of his father.   The visual center of the painting is where the father’s hands rest upon his son’s shoulders and hold him close.  Some have suggested that Rembrandt made the father’s left hand masculine (larger, a bit more rough) and his right hand feminine (more smooth and slender).   Was Rembrandt suggesting both maternal and paternal qualities in the father’s (God’s) forgiveness?

The writer of Psalm 51 now speaks of a remarkable transformation.  Upon receiving God’s forgiveness (the restoration of the joy of salvation), the psalmist declares that  “Then I will teach transgressors your ways and sinners will return to you.”   The writer who himself was lost, fortified with God’s forgiveness, now goes out to reach others who are lost.

How often is it in the Bible that we read of how God uses someone who was lost or even hostile to God’s purposes (think Jacob or Saul of Tarsus).    In some of these cases, the transformation is so great that God re-names the person (Jacob to Israel, Saul to Paul).    That’s good news twice over.   No matter what has taken place in our lives, God can use us, indeed is seeking to use us, to further God’s kingdom.   And if we happen to count ourselves among the lost, God is using people of faith to find us, reach us, and guide us back home.

Prayer

O lead me, Lord, that I may lead
The wandering and the wavering feet;
O feed me, Lord, that I may feed
Thy hungering ones with manna sweet.

O use me, Lord, use even me,
Just as Thou wilt, and when, and where,
Until Thy blessèd face I see,
Thy rest, Thy joy, Thy glory share.

Amen

 

 

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